Another Military General Gets the Sack
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Burma

Another Military General Gets the Sack


By THE IRRAWADDY Tuesday, August 9, 2011


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Military sources in Burma have told The Irrawaddy that the inspector and auditor-general of the country's armed forces, Maj-Gen Kyaw Phyo, has been forced to retire following an investigation into allegations of corruption aimed at several high-ranking military officers.

If confirmed, Kyaw Phyo becomes the fourth general to be sacked since February, following the removal of Lt-Gen “Thura” Myint Aung who was adjutant-general, Brig-Gen Tun Than, the former commander of Rangoon Regional Military Command, and Maj-Gen Tin Ngwe, the former chief of the Bureau of Special Operations-5.

Maj-Gen Kyaw Phyo (PHOTO: S.H.A.N.)
Kyaw Phyo, formerly the commander of the Triangle Regional Military Command, is believed to have been accused of smuggling cars via Burma's porous border with Thailand.

Kyaw Phyo was promoted to the position of “Inspector and Auditor-General of the Armed Forces” in late August 2010 during a massive military reshuffle. He was previously commander-in-chief of the Triangle Regional Military Command based in Kengtung in eastern Shan State, an area known for trade routes and smuggling syndicates.

In late July, media reports suggested five generals were being investigated for corruption: Kyaw Phyo; Maj-Gen Myint Soe, the chief of BSO-1; Maj-Gen Khin Zaw Oo, the adjutant general and chair of the military-run Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings Ltd; Brig-Gen Thein Tun Oo, the commander of the Triangle RMC; and Brig-Gen Khin Maung Htay, the commander of the Coastal RMC.

Meanwhile, rumors abound in Naypyidaw that further forced retirements are on the cards. Some military families have voiced the opinion that the investigation focuses on certain military officers because they had been outspoken in calling for better conditions for soldiers.

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meater Wrote:
10/08/2011
Auditor General, sacked. How can the country progress, a shame, shame on TS and his cronies. Hope there are more still to be sacked.

TAH Wrote:
10/08/2011
Now that Sr. Gen Than Shwe and his deputy Maung Aye, who could be regarded as the last two from inner circle of late dictator Ne Win’s orbit, are now gone (but not to the grave yet). So they learnt the art of cheating, lying, brutal killing, spinning and all other cunning methods from their master Ne Win in ruling the country to the bottom and probably passed down their tactics to some of current leaders. But in the army we now have new generation of fresh officers who were quite young during 8888 uprisings and so hopefully they have learnt positively all those changes happening around the immediate region, Arab world and the world in general for our country’s lasting benefits and make a mark turn around in not so distant future and let the public run the country efficiently and democratically while they go back to their very place barrack and obey the rules under a truly civilian government. This is just my positive thinking in anticipation!

Terry Evans Wrote:
10/08/2011
Soldiers like all others are subject to the law of Karma and will not escape the Karmic fruits.

Mualcin Wrote:
10/08/2011
I applaud. I will applaud even more if all the generals are thrown into jail because all of them commit/committed crimes.

Tettoe Aung Wrote:
10/08/2011
All the king's horses and all the king's men could not get Humpty Dumpty back again. The very foundation of the military regime is based on 'corruption' how can any one of them be clean? One might be able to separate the water from all the rivers flowing into the ocean but I don't think you can ever separate corrupt general from non-corrupt general in Burma's military.

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