Editorial
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EDITOR'S PERSPECTIVE

Editorial


By The Irrawaddy MARCH, 1999 - VOLUME 7 NO.3


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(Page 11 of 11)

Police later said three hundred trucks would not be enough to transport all these weapons.

In 1990, UPI reported that ammunition and explosives worth millions of US dollars were delivered from the US government to the Thai military and subsequently smuggled out for sale on the underground arms market in Thailand.

Who benefited from the arms trade? The book said, "First, participants and beneficiaries from the trade include some ministers, MPs, top party officials, big businessmen, local godfathers, police and military officers. They have both political and financial clout as well as deadly weapons." Second, the book identified the Thai government’s security policy. The police in fact promote conflicts in neighboring countries, which generate the demand for arms. Third, well connected organized crime gangs and arms trade networks in Thailand. These networks are well established inside the country and internationally. The book said, "The contraband arms trade still exists because influential people are involved in the trade." [Top]

Based on Guns, Girls, Gambling, Ganja, by Pasuk Phongpaichit, Nualnoi Treerat and Sungsidh Piriyarangsan. Published by Silkworm Books, 1998.



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